23 July 2017
Don't lose your cool in a hot garage!

 You just finished dressing and fixing your hair in the coolness of your home only to become hot and flushed by the time it takes you to hop into your car to begin the day.   Don't sweat it.....here's a host of great tips to lower that temperature and keep your cool. 

Let there be air flow!

If you are fortunate enough to have a window, install an exhaust fan to help pull the hot air out.  If you feel comfortable with the idea, you can open the garage door about a foot to help with circulation as well.  Even a well placed box fan can help with air flow if you are doing some tinkering in the garage.  Always make sure the garage door is closed and any fans turned off at the end of day. 

Don't be full of hot air.

Think of the ceiling of your garage like the attic in your home.  Hot air rises and gets trapped in that space.  Adding a vent to the roof will give all that hot air a way to escape, thus keeping the overall garage cooler.  Insulating your ceiling is an another way to keep that hotter air from coming into the working area of your garage.  

If these walls could talk.

They would say “add some insulation to us too”.   If you choose this option, make sure to encapsulate the insulation with some wall board material. This would prevent tearing and wear from pets and younger children.  Applying weather stripping around an entrance door or the bottom of the garage door will help keep the warmer air out.  You could also caulk around a window or door if you saw small gaps in those areas as well.

Consider some shade.

If your garage is used as an extension of your home in terms of living space maybe consider adding an adjustable roll away awning to the sunny side of the garage to keep that summer sun at bay.  If you are revamping your landscaping, a well-placed tree can provide leafy shade during the warmer months and the loss of leaves in the winter will allow the sun to peek through and warm the garage...bonus!

Think light.

Darker colors absorb heat.  Painting your garage door a crisp white, beige or cream will help reflect the heat.  Another choice is a cool roof system.  A more costly selection, these materials help absorb the sun's energy and reflect more heat.  Available in the form of paints, tiles and sheet coverings, this option would be more suited to a garage that has been converted to a home gym or living space.

We hope these tips will make your garage a bit more tolerable in the summer months or at least a little less rumpled till you get to work.  

21 June 2017
National Garage Door Safety Month
Garage Door Safety

 

The International Door Association has deemed June National Garage Door Safety Month. Your garage door is the largest heaviest moving object in your home. Over 77% of garage door related injuries occur at a person's own property.  Keep your family, pets and automobiles safe all year round by following these simple tips.

 

 

Every month inspect your garage door and the surrounding mechanics.  Look over your cables, springs, rollers and tracks.  Look for any objects, such as leaves or other debris, that may be in the way of these areas that would cause a problem.  If you hear a lot of grinding or scraping apply a spray lubricant to keep the tracks running smoothly.  The average life span of most springs and cables is approximately 10,000 cycles or roughly 6 to 10 years.  Please consider calling a professional to replace these items, as they are tension mounted and may cause injury to the do-it yourselfer.  Do not operate the door if you feel there is an area that needs repair.

Since 1993 overhead garage doors are required to have auto reverse sensors to indicate if an object is in the way of the door as it closes.  Check these sensors monthly by placing a soft object, such as a roll of paper towels, in front of the sensor.  If the door does not automatically move back up, check the wires to make sure they have not been chewed on or disconnected in any way.  Over time the sensor itself may become dirty, wiping each lens with a soft cloth ensures the beam does not get interrupted.  If the beam seems broken it could indicate the brackets have become misaligned. Tightening the brackets may solve the problem, if not, you may have to replace them.   If your garage door does not have sensors it may be time to upgrade to a door that does to avoid an injury.  

 

              

Talk to your children about garage door safety.   Encourage them not to play with the opener or the remote.  Make sure your opener is placed at a height that small children cannot access.  Instruct your kids not to leave bikes or toys in front of the garage or inside where they could get run over.  Never open or close the door when kids or pets are close by.   If you have older children, teach them how to use the emergency release pull.... make sure you know how to use this as well!

Staying safe extends to when you go on vacation as well.   Inform a trusted neighbor of the days you will be gone and have them notify you if they see any odd activity near your garage door.  Take remote controls out of your car and keep them in the house until you return.  Some newer garage door models have a vacation mode feature that can be activated so your remotes are disabled.  Upon your return, simply deactivate this setting from the wall control in the garage and you are back in business.  

 

 A little prevention and knowing what to look for can save you and your family from a garage door related injury.  A.B.E Doors and Windows cares about you and your home, if you feel your garage door could use a little love please contact us at 610. 398. 2430.  

 

 

19 May 2017
Organize Your Garage to Fit YOUR Needs
Have fun Organizing

 Organize Your Garage to Fit YOUR Needs

 Now that you have spring cleaned your home from top to bottom, let's move your focus outside the home to your garage. Has it been awhile since you were able to park your car in it?  If your car does fit, are you tip-toeing around stuff to get to your car door and hoping you don't knock anything over?  If the answer was yes to either of those questions, let’s look at some practical solutions that translate well for any garage space. 

                   

                                   Before                                                                                          After

The first step is to clear out the garage from top to bottom.  As you remove items place them into three piles.  Trash, Keep and Donate or Sell.  Really assess the item...when was the last time you used those roller-blades?  If it's been over three years, it's probably time to let it go.  Have some bags and boxes handy for the items you donate and make a plan to drop them off later that day.  Try not to bring it back into your home or garage. While the garage is empty give it a good sweep.  It is also an excellent time to check your garage door opener for wear and tear. Make a note if you see something that needs repairing.

 

The next step is to sort the items you are keeping.  Grouping them into like categories will help you determine how to organize your garage area.  Examples would be: toys and sports equipment, lawn & garden, tools and perhaps holiday items.  Now that you have your groupings, take a look at the garage space and create different zones for those items.  If your garage is attached to your home you may want to designate that space near the door to be used as a pantry or an area for coats, shoes and school belongings. 

                    

 

Utilize vertical and overhead storage solutions to your advantage.  A simple pegboard with an assortment of hooks can hold all your tools.  A clever trick to remember what goes where is to trace the outline of the tool onto the pegboard!  A solid shelf and some sturdy S hooks can help create a sports zone for bicycles, golf equipment and sports gear that may only get used at certain times of the year. When installing any overhead solution, always make sure they do not impede the opening and closing of your garage door.  

                                

 

Wooden pallets and PVC pipe are two inexpensive ways to corral all your long handled garden tools.  A small shelf can hold potting supplies, gloves and smaller gardening implements.   As you put things away it's a great idea to label things.  That way everyone knows where items belong. 

 

                                                

 You've worked hard.  Take a moment to enjoy the fruits of your labor and the reclaiming of your car's parking spot.  If you have energy left, lace up those roller-blades and take a loop around the block.