24 October 2016
Lead Poison Prevention Week - what you should know.

Today, childhood lead poisoning is considered the most preventable environmental disease among young children. A simple blood test can prevent permanent damage that will last a lifetime. Lead Poisoning Prevention Week is October 23rd-29th. We wanted to discuss the dangers of children being exposed to lead and how to take proper precautions.

According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) potential risks of lead poisoning can cause damage to the brain and nervous system, slowed growth and development, learning and behavior problems and hearing and speech problems.

Lead can be found in all parts of our environment – the air, the soil, the water, and even inside our homes. Lead and lead compounds have been used in a wide variety of products found in and around our homes.

Lead is particularly dangerous to children because their growing bodies absorb more lead than adults do and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Babies and young children can also be more highly exposed to lead because they often put their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil or from playing with toys with lead paint.

You can lower the chances of exposure to lead in your home, both now and in the future, by taking simple steps like keeping your home clean and well-maintained.

Check out the link below on Lead Poisoning Home Checklist and ask yourself the questions and make sure your home is safe. If you think your child has been exposed to lead, seek out medical attention through your pediatrician or family physician for immediate attention.

https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/documents/parent_checklist3.pdf